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Eyewear For Rock climbing

eyewear for rock climbing bozeman mt

Expert rock climbers use eyewear that has compatible lenses and gives the best UV protection through polarized lenses. The lenses are usually made with a prescription so one’s visual perception stays clear. Regardless of whether you’re a normal hiker or the sort of individual who reaches the highest peaks, the assortment of eyewear accessible to keep your eyes healthy covers all ranges.

Most shades or UV protected lenses come in classifications or levels of darkness/tint. They begin from level 0 which has no tint or scarcely any whatsoever, up to level 4, which is the darkest available. The normal match of shades available is around level 3, which blocks out about 80% of visible light. This enhances stability for most exercises, for example, driving, strolling through a neighborhood trail, and just keeping your eyes shielded from a run of the mill, splendid sunny day.

Be that as it may, when you’re rock climbing and particularly when you’re vigorously engaged in the game, you require most likely level four class lenses, however you’ll need to ensure it’s reflective as well. As much as you can avoid the glare from hitting your eyes when you’re going after that unseen corner, the better you’ll have the capacity to focus and play your best.

Deciding which brand design is best depends on what style, spending plan, and kind of sport you prefer. In case you’re hoping to get a decent match of polarized glasses that you can wear all the time, you’ll find one at Bridger Eyecare for sure! At our Bozeman eye care center we stock designer brands of eyewear that cater to sports minded people.

A Vision of Back-To-School

asian girl reading book bozeman mtThe new school year is coming up fast, and parents and students are getting ready to embark on new adventures and experiences. But this is also a reminder to parents that good eyesight is possibly the most important school supply your child may not have. A good education for children doesn’t just mean good schools, good teachers and good friends. Good vision is just as important. Dr. Carl Roth from Bridger Eyecare explains, “Your child’s eyes are his/her gateway into the world of learning. When your child’s vision is not functioning properly, learning and participation in recreational activities will suffer. Children are not likely to recognize vision problems or report them, and it is therefore the responsibility of parents and teachers to recognize signs of visual problems in their children.”

There is a basic set of vision skills that are needed for school. The first is near vision. This is the ability to see clearly at a distance of about 10-13 inches. This is obviously important for reading, writing and close work at your child’s desk. Distance vision, the ability to see clearly and comfortably beyond arm’s reach, is also important in order to see the board in the classroom, and Binocular coordination, or the ability to use both eyes together, is important for extra-curricular activities. Both are vision skills needed to be successful in school. Additionally, focusing skills, peripheral awareness and eye-hand coordination are also important. As a parent, it is your job to be alert for symptoms that may indicate your child has a vision or visual processing problem. A few examples of common conditions that may effect your child’s ability to learn are below:

If your child gets headaches while trying to read or do other close work, exhibits a short attention span during visual tasks, and/or has to use a finger to guide reading, it is possible your child may have a condition called convergence insufficiency. This is a condition in which the eyes have a hard time converging on a certain point close up. This may also cause the words to “jump” or “blur” when your child attempts to read.

You may also find that your child’s eyes do not seem to move together, that the eyes do not face the same direction, and/or that your child tilts his/her head or squints in order to see better. This could indicate a condition called Strabismus. This results from muscles in one or both eyes being misaligned or underdeveloped. This can cause severe difficulty for your child, and may cause more significant problems, including loss of depth perception, if not treated promptly. Dr. Roth adds, “Other symptoms to look out for that may signal vision related problems are difficulty remembering or identifying shapes, difficulty remembering what was read, excessive blinking or rubbing of his/her eyes, or placing his/her head very close to the book or desk when reading or writing”.

Because changes in your child’s vision can occur without you or your child noticing them, your child should visit the eye doctor every year or more frequently if specific problems or risk factors exist. Remember, school vision or pediatrician’s screenings are good, but they are not a substitute for a thorough eye exam.

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Eyewear For Kayaking and Whitewater Rafting

kayak_1

For people who regularly paddle in rough surf, river and whitewater environments, equipment is always a subject of concern. There are quite a few sources of information about how to prepare for and buy this gear – such as dry suits, helmets, paddles, and even boats and kayaks.

However, just as important as the gear is the appropriate eyewear for kayaking and rafting. For successful and enjoyable outdoor boating of this kind, it is critical that good eyewear is purchased. For such athletes who are in need of corrective vision options, eyewear becomes an immediate concern. Generally speaking, there are four options: glasses, contacts, prescription goggles, and laser corrective surgery. However, because the decision to have surgery is a very personal one, and because many people disregard goggles as an uncomfortable and inconvenient option, the two most often chosen for kayakers and paddlers are glasses and contact lenses.

Glasses

When it comes to this debate, there is a clear choice for the average paddler: contact lenses offer corrected vision with no risk of hassles or issues that can easily arise from wearing glasses out on the river.

Here are a few specific issues to consider when making your eyewear choice:

Splash – The most obvious problem with wearing glasses in a choppy paddling environment is that splash from the river can obscure your vision. There is really no way to keep water droplets off of glasses, so while the lenses will correct your vision, you will be limited in other ways.

Steam – It is quite common in an environment such as out on the river for glasses lenses to steam up as your glasses need to cope with the change in temperature between the water and the air. This can actually be a worse obstruction than splash droplets – a steamed lens can become completely opaque, which can be at the best inconvenient and at the worst dangerous.

Loss – In large surf or during hole moves on the river it is not uncommon to lose your glasses. Glasses are made to fit tightly enough that they don’t fall off at random, but abrupt or violent shifts in position can still knock them out of place. You could, therefore, be inconvenienced by dropping your glasses into your boat, or, even worse, into the river!

Ultimately, the above-listed inconveniences are enough to make contact lenses the logical choice for paddlers and indeed other water sport enthusiasts. In fact, to make the decision even clearer, there are even some newer models of contact lenses that are specifically designed for enhanced stability. This can be helpful while kayaking or paddling, as significant splash can knock even contact lenses out of place!

If, however, you prefer prescription sports goggles see our specialty eyewear page.

Call Us 406-200-8886
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Specialty Eyewear

Which Are the Right Sunglasses for Me?

glasses 20tortoiseshellFinding the right pair of sunglasses to fit your personal style is often an important part of making your summer outfit picture perfect. But beyond “picture perfect,” a carefully chosen pair of sunglasses can grant you great health advantages and help safeguard your eyes against the elements.

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a familiar concept to many and the damage it can cause to your skin is well known as well. Much less well known, however, is the damage that UV radiation can do to your eyes. Too much UV radiation can give your eyes a kind of ‘sunburn of the eye,’ called photokeratitis, and excessive UV exposure over your lifetime can significantly increase your chances of developing serious problems with your eyes later in life, such as age related macular degeneration and cataracts. Expert studies suggest that high quality sunglasses can significantly reduce the amount of UV rays entering your eyes, reducing your risk of photokeratitis and long term damage. Furthermore, since they protect the sensitive skin around the eyes from receiving too much direct UV radiation, wearing sunglasses may also help to reduce wrinkles.

Excessive UV radiation is not the only risk sunglasses can help you reduce. Everyday reflective surfaces, such as snow, water, road surfaces and car windshields, reflect a great deal of light and can do significant damage to your eyes with extended exposure. Good sunglasses can do a great deal to protect your eyes against this glare. Furthermore, sunglasses can help prevent potentially life threatening situations by reducing the chances that bright glare may momentarily blind you while driving or biking.

Quality sunglasses are also very important for reducing eyestrain, headaches and fatigue. The opening at the front of the eye, called the pupil, controls the amount of light that enters your eye. In conditions in which a great deal of light is present, such as when you walk outside on a very sunny day, the pupil may be unable to constrict enough to keep light to a comfortable level, causing you to squint in order to further limit the amount of incoming light. Muscle fatigue associated with constant squinting and the continued constriction of the pupil can cause headaches, fatigue and eyestrain.

As a general rule, any time you step outside, you should wear sunglasses to protect your eyes. However, there are certain times when this is particularly true: In the summer UV radiation is at least 3 times higher than it is in the winter, and at the beach, no matter the season, reflection from the water can be quite intense. In these situations, sunglasses are an absolute must for proper eye health. This is also true if you’ve just had any kind of surgery or are taking medicine that makes your eyes extra sensitive to light.

For more information, contact your Bridger Eyecare eye doctor today.

Glaucoma is a common eye condition in which your optic nerve, the bundle of nerves at the back of the eye, which feeds visual information to the brain, is damaged because of high inner eye pressure, known as intraocular pressure. This condition can lead to total permanent blindness in a short amount of time if it is not treated properly. Furthermore, glaucoma usually has no noticeable symptoms, and patients diagnosed with glaucoma usually note that they did not feel or notice anything unusual about their vision at all. So, what can be done to detect glaucoma, and how can you prevent it?

As mentioned before, glaucoma usually shows no symptoms until significant damage has already been done to your eyes. This means that waiting until you already see or feel a difference in your eyes or vision will significantly increase the chances that irreversible damage may already have been done to your vision before glaucoma is detected and treatment is started. Therefore, the most important and effective way to prevent glaucoma is to have a comprehensive eye exam at least once a year, that includes screening and tests for glaucoma, so that signs and risk factors of glaucoma can be identified early.

Recent technological advances in retinal scanning and glaucoma screenings have made earlier and earlier detection of glaucoma possible. This advanced technology allows your eye doctor to measure your inner eye pressure (known as tonometry), inspect the drainage angle of your eye (known as gonioscopy), evaluate your optic nerve (known as ophthalmolscopy) and test the visual field of each eye (known as perimetry). Each of these tests measures for certain indications that allow your eye doctor to detect glaucoma early and begin treatment, such as prescribing special eye drops meant to treat the inner eye pressure that characterizes glaucoma, which are often the first line of defense against glaucoma if these indications present themselves.

Along with regular eye exams to ensure early detection, a number of other steps can be taken to proactively prevent the development of Glaucoma. A regular program of moderate exercise has been proven to benefit your overall health. For instance exercise such as walking or jogging three or more times every week can help lower your intraocular pressure. Eye injuries, such as blunt force trauma, and severe eye infections have also been linked to traumatic glaucoma or secondary glaucoma, so protecting your eyes from injury and keeping them clean of bacteria are also important for preventing glaucoma.

For more information about glaucoma and how to prevent it, contact your Bridger Eyecare eye doctor today.

The most well-known part of a comprehensive eye exam is the basic visionblog_photo_12_31_15 test. When you have a general vision test, one of the main conditions the eye care practitioner is checking for is a refractive error. A refractive error means there is an abnormality in the shape of the eye, changing the eye’s ability to focus light directly onto the retina.This causes blurred vision and can usually be corrected by wearing prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses and possibly, alternate treatments such as vision therapy, ortho-k, LASIK or refractive surgery such as LASIK.

The term, “refractive error” refers to a problem with the process of refraction that is responsible for sight. Normally, light rays that enter your eye are refracted or bent through the cornea and the lens, and ultimately converge or are focused onto a single point on the retina. From the retina, messages are sent through the optic nerve to the brain which then interprets these signals into the image that we are seeing.

In order for this process to work effectively, the anatomy of the eye including the length of the eye and the curvature of the cornea and the lens must be just right to be able to focus the light onto the retina. When this is not the case, a refractive error will occur.

There are several different types of refractive errors, depending on which part of the eye is affected, and it is possible to have multiple refractive errors at the same time:

Myopia or nearsightedness:
In myopia the length of the eyeball is too long which results in light coming to a focus in front of the retina, rather than on the retina. This allows the individual to see well when objects are close but not clearly when looking at objects at a distance.

Hyperopia or farsightedness:
Hyperopia is when the eyeball is shorter than normal and can result in near objects being blurry. However, people experience hyperopia differently. Sometimes distant objects are clear while other times people may experience overall blurred vision near and far or no problems at all. In children particularly, the lens may accommodate for the error allowing for clear vision but may cause fatigue and sometimes crossed eyes or strabismus. Hyperopia causes eyestrain or fatigue especially when looking at near objects for a period of time. Often people with 20/20 vision may still need glasses at their desk to relax their eyes and improve concentration.

Astigmatism:
Astigmatism is usually the result of an irregularly shaped cornea (although it can sometimes also be due to a misshapen lens). The cornea, which is normally round, is more football-shaped in an eye with astigmatism, resulting in multiple focus points either in front of the retina or behind it (or both). People with astigmatism usually have blurred or distorted vision to some degree at all distances, near and far.

Presbyopia:
Presbyopia is an age-related condition which usually begins to appear sometime after 40. As the eye begins to age, the lens stiffens and can no longer focus clearly on objects that are close.

It’s important to note that presbyopia is often confused with hyperopia, as both cause problems focusing at near distances. However, high hyperopia can also cause blur at far distances as well, especially in dim lighting, and depth perception problems can result in motor vehicle accidents. In these instances people with hyperopia could use glasses at any distance.
If you are having trouble seeing, it is important to have an eye exam to determine the cause of the problem and to effectively correct your vision. Even if your vision is fine, you should schedule a routine eye exam on a regular basis to ensure that your eyes are healthy and that any potential problems are caught early.

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